What You Should Know About Negotiating Salaries

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Through working in the recruiting industry, we’ve learned quite a bit about negotiating pay. While pay might be the number one thing that job candidates are concerned about, pay is the last thing recruiters are concerned about. When we consider sending a candidate to our client, we look at a few things: skill-set, ability to execute and do the work, and company fit.

Several factors influence pay ranges, and budgets for positions vary depending on both the client and the candidate. While a candidate might be looking for a certain salary at a company that expects a 50-hour workweek, the pay will be much different for a company that has a 35-hour workweek. Each company has its own budget for salaries, expectations, and benefits. These are components that both the recruiter and the candidate should take into consideration.

Recruiters should be prepared for candidates to come into this process with some knowledge about salary negotiations. It’s the recruiter’s job to work with the client to make a counter offer if a proposed salary is unrealistic. The salary might be too low or too high depending on the market rate for the position. Recruiters can and should work with candidates to negotiate salaries according to market rates. It’s important to note that clients that don’t pay their employees according to market rates inevitably lose employees to companies with more competitive salaries. This reflects poorly on both the recruiter and their clients.

Job seekers, here’s what you should keep in mind when negotiating pay with recruiters:

Never underestimate the value of honesty. If you show you are someone with ethics and integrity—and allow the recruiter to get to know you for your skills, experience, and professional reputation—recruiters will be more likely to place you. It’s all about company fit.

Know the market and competition. Your role in this process is significant. There is often limited flexibility for negotiation, so knowing your value and being able to assert that value is crucial. There are several salary surveys online that can help ensure you’re knowledgeable about salaries in your field. Use this to your advantage, but keep budget restrictions in mind. The way you ask is most important, so reference your employer’s needs, not your own, in justifying more pay.

Don’t draw out the recruitment process. Prompt responses are crucial in developing a professional reputation. The art of negotiation can be very sensitive, so remember that it is the recruiter’s aim is to find the best candidate for the job in a timely manner.

At Financial Professionals, we handle the negotiating. The recruiter acts as a messenger and will hear honest feedback from both the client and the candidate. When a company hires us to find candidates and fill positions, we know what the budget is. It’s our job to determine whether or not someone is the best candidate for the role, and if we don’t get the sense that it’s a good fit we won’t send that person to the company. We take care of your hiring needs on both ends. Visit our Employers page to learn how we can meet your staffing needs and, if you’re looking for a job, our Job Seekers page. We look forward to helping you find the right match.

Priscilla Stricker

Priscilla is the Managing Partner who oversees operations, staffing and business development for Financial Professionals. She has 15+ years' experience in the staffing industry, which has allowed her a successful career of finding the right fit for clients as well as candidates. Specialties have included banking, commercial real estate, title, mortgage, accounting and financial positions at all levels.

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9 Interview Tips for Recent College Graduates

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-business-hand-shake-closeup-two-colleagues-image40707292Right now it’s job search season for college graduates, which can be both exciting and stressful. Interviewing for jobs is critical and you don’t want to blow it because you might not get a second chance. We’ve rounded up nine interview tips that are tried and true. Graduates, best of luck!

1. Do your homework.

Dedicate time to research the job, company and industry you’re interested in by arranging informal interviews with alumni who work in your field. Discover what trends you should know about to be successful. Analyze the job you’re applying for by looking at the skills, knowledge and personal qualities required for the role and use that to dictate your interview responses. Also, visit the company’s website, LinkedIn page and social media accounts to learn about its brand, objectives and its history. The more you know about a business the more you can market yourself as a great candidate.

2. Write your questions in advance.

You should show up as prepared as possible to show that you’re good at planning, and show your interest for the job and the company.

The Huffington Post puts it perfectly:

There’s a difference between “Tell me about the culture” and “Tell me about how major decisions are made here and provide an example of a recent decision and the process used.” Or, “I read that the organization is changing its strategic direction. How will that affect this business unit?” Avoid questions where answers are on the website.

3. Show your employer more than just a resume.

Create an online portfolio that showcases your skills. Your portfolio should have samples of your past work from internships, classes and volunteer projects. When candidates show us a link that directs them to samples of their work, not only are we impressed but also we get a sense of the candidate’s creativity and fluency in modern technology. Pro tip: print out a copy of your portfolio and use it as a presentation prop during your interview.

4. Be prepared to tell stories.

Anecdotes that highlight your skills and your ability to apply them are more memorable with recruiters more than just listing your accolades. Anyone can make claims in a job interview, but few can back them up. Make a list of about five to ten key assets you possess that are relevant to the job — such as skills, experience, knowledge, etc. — and connect them with examples or anecdotes that show you used that strength to successfully carry out a work role. When describing the context and the problem, explain what you did to improve the situation and elaborate in quantifiable terms. Recruiters definitely want to see what impact on an organization you have made in the past.

5. Practice, practice, practice.

Anticipate some of the typical questions recruiters ask and have your answers and examples rehearsed so you sound natural. Practice out loud in front of the mirror! Here’s a list of some common questions:

–       Tell me about yourself.

–       What are your strengths and weaknesses.

–       Tell me about your greatest accomplishments.

–       Share a time you failed and how you responded to the situation.

–       Why do you want this job?

–       Why this organization?

You should be able to answer these questions clearly and directly without hesitation. If you happen to still be in school, take advantage of your campus career center and sign up to do a mock interview with a career counselor.

6. Be passionate.

One of the top reasons people do not get job offers is they don’t communicate their excitement about the opportunity. Smile and be enthusiastic or your interviewer will question if you really want the job or will be committed to the company. Remember that it’s okay to show your personality and to be yourself. Employers often opt for the candidate they want to work with on a day-to-day basis.

7. Show your confidence with your body language.

Many candidates worry so much about what they need to say that they forget about body language. Remember to sit up straight, shake hands firmly, make eye contact, avoid fidgeting and listen carefully.

8. Act like a salesperson.

Successful salespeople know how to close meetings with clients by ending with a strong closing statement that reflects their enthusiasm for the position. A closing statement should essentially be a summary of the interview. Make it clear that you are excited and interested in the opportunity, reinforce why you’re a great hire for the job and clarify the next steps. Should you follow up via phone or email? When will you hear back?

9. Follow up with a ‘thank you.’

This may be one of the most critical pieces of advice you should remember; it’s expected. Follow up with a brief and professional thank you email a few hours after the interview, and use it as an opportunity to reiterate your excitement about the company and the position. If you really want to stand out, send a hand-written thank you note the day of the interview!

Looking for more job-seeking advice? Take a look at these blogs!

Priscilla Stricker

Priscilla is the Managing Partner who oversees operations, staffing and business development for Financial Professionals. She has 15+ years' experience in the staffing industry, which has allowed her a successful career of finding the right fit for clients as well as candidates. Specialties have included banking, commercial real estate, title, mortgage, accounting and financial positions at all levels.

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Five Ways to Make Sure Your Resume is Free of Gaps

B4_resume_creativecommons_flazingo copyOver the past three decades working in the recruiting industry, we’ve seen a lot of no-nos during our interview process. Among these are the many times when we’ve find ourselves interviewing candidates for positions that have gaps in their resumes. Sometimes the gaps are for less than a few months, which can be explained if the person was in school or on maternity leave. But significantly long gaps that can’t be explained are red (or sometimes yellow) flags for us because we immediately assume the applicant is irresponsible, and we rarely send prospective employees to people who have a spotty resume. When leaving a job, know that you’ll have to do something to fill the gap on your resume, and be prepared to explain why you took a break from the workplace.

Here are five tips to make sure your resume is free of gaps!

1. Revamp Your Resume

List the years instead of the months and years. Not everyone is a fan of this strategy, but this practice is acceptable and will make you look good on paper. However, if you’re gap is longer than a year, this won’t make help conceal any gaps.

Here’s are some examples we pulled from Susan Ireland’s Resume Site:

11/09 – 4/12, Night Manager, Taco Bell, Woodmont, NY

3/07 – 2/09, Day Manager, Denny’s Restaurant, Milpitas, CA

If you use only years and eliminate the months, there is no apparent gap:

2009-2012, Night Manager, Taco Bell, Woodmont, NY

2007-2009, Day Manager, Denny’s Restaurant, Milpitas, CA

During your interview, you should explain why you have a period of unemployment that spans two calendar years or more. If you were traveling, volunteering or training, include this in your resume if it’s relevant to your job. For example, if you decide to study Spanish abroad for a couple of years, and you’re applying for a job that requires you to speak Spanish, you may want to write.

2010-2013, Spanish student in Madrid, Spain

If the gap in your work history is not relevant, then just explain it honestly during your interview. Stay positive and maintain your integrity. You don’t want to refer to illness, unemployment, rehabilitation or anything that implies you’re a high-risk job seeker. Rather, Susan Ireland suggests using some of these suggested “job titles” (below) and listing them under a “Work History” section, rather than under your “Professional Experience.”

Full-time Student

Independent Study

Full-time Parent

Family Management

Estate Management

2.     Volunteer

It’s always good to show that you’re making an effort to use your professional skill-set. Focus on a volunteer position related to the line of work you’re pursuing.  Donating your financial or business expertise to a charity will add more substance to your resume than stating that you served meals at a soup kitchen.

3.     Seek out additional certifications and training

The more your focus on your professional development, the more valuable you are to your employer, so use the time during your unemployed periods to attend training courses or classes you’ve been meaning to take. Brushing up on your technical skills and learning new software tools related to your field is beneficial, but it’s even better to get certified (such as getting a PMP for project managers) to differentiate your resume from the competition. Several professional associations, local colleges, online courses, etc. offer training opportunities. But before you invest in a certification or degree, scan the job openings you’re looking to see how frequently it’s mentioned as being a requirement.

 4. Be prepared for questions about the gaps

Whatever the reason is, get comfortable telling your story about why you have a break in your work experience by developing a quick and confident elevator speech.

5. Find a temporary job or contract work

Hiring managers loving seeing that you are staying busy and keeping your skills fresh via contract or temporary work. There is definitely a value to showing you’ve been working, even if it’s not full-time, and you get exposure to new tools and industries. Just remember that recruiters are thorough, so make sure that the project you are working on is considered a real project; that it’s not just a gig you have working with your friends. If you’re working for yourself, you should treat the position with the same importance as all of the other positions listed by listing your accomplishments. An additional benefit to temping is you have another company that can act as a reference, and having a good reference will help alleviate recruiters concerns with your ability to stick with a company long-term.

Are you looking for a temporary position? Follow us on LinkedIn for updates on our temporary positions, and visit our Temporary and Contract listings page.

Morgan Lilley

Morgan is the Recruiting Manager for Financial Professionals. She brings over five years of accounting experience to the position and has proven effectual in finding top talent within the financial industry. Her areas of experience include business administration, accounting, payroll, mortgage and title.

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Big Banks vs. Community Banks

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In today’s world, increasingly more Americans are seeking out alternatives to big banks. Business Insider reports that 74% of Americans have “some or very little confidence” in large banks, while just 10% reported “a great deal of confidence.” Though smaller banks usually offer fewer conveniences (such as online banking and weekend hours), many make up for their small size with incentives, lower fees, and business-friendly solutions. They are also usually more engaged in their local communities.

When deciding which financial institution will meet your needs, consider the pros and cons of big banks, small banks, and credit unions and how they fit you or your business’ needs.

Accessibility

Big banks offer plenty of ATMs and branches, as well as attractive hours. Though smaller banks have a more limited selection, many will reimburse ATM fees for their customers. Also, more and more small banks and credit unions offer solutions for customers on the go. Mobile apps can help you find a nearby ATM, and growing technology means that more people no longer need to visit a branch for their daily transactions.

Fees

From monthly maintenance to overdraft fees, it’s important to consider how much a bank could cost you. According to money-rates.com, the typical customer at leading banks pays nearly $150 per year in checking account fees. Credit unions and smaller banks have less overhead, so they are able to pass on savings and lower fees to customers. More than 70% of the largest credit unions offer free checking, compared to 39% of banks, according to Bankrate.com.

Lending Flexibility

Big banks want to do business with big clients. Experts agree that community banks are the best option for both personal and business loans. The Washington Post reports that community banks are in a better position than larger institutions to set their own guidelines, and Bankrate reports that community banks are often positioned to offer more commercial loans than big banks.

Are you looking for a small bank or credit union in your neighborhood? Since we’ve been directly working with most of them in the South since 1981, let us be a resource. Call me and I’ll let you know which ones to contact!

Ron Ray

Ron Ray is Owner/Chief Executive Officer of Financial Professionals, a Dallas-based financial staffing agency. Since 1981, Ron has worked with a variety of banks and banking professionals to ensure they are working with the best talent.

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How to Attract Recruiters on LinkedIn

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Being in the recruiting business, we’re on LinkedIn… a lot. And like many recruiters, we spend several hours a week growing our own network and viewing potential candidates profile. Surveys show that 90% of recruiters, within companies and external headhunting agencies, use LinkedIn to find talent. In fact, if you’re not on LinkedIn you probably don’t exist to us—which isn’t a good thing if you’re looking for a job or open to new opportunities. Job postings are old news, and sometimes it’s better to search than to rely on resumes from desperate job hunters.

If you’re thinking, that’s never happened to me! A recruiter has never friend-ed me or sent me a message, then you probably need to do more with your profile. Make the most out of LinkedIn by establishing a strong presence. Follow these eight steps:

1. Create a detailed Profile Summary

We like it when people include their email at the top of their summary because when they come up as a masked connection, we know how to reach them.

Also, tell what you do and us who you are! We’re always looking for people who are passionate about their jobs.

2. Choose your photo wisely

LinkedIn is not the place to be cute. Make sure to present your best face on this platform by posting a high quality photo of you smiling and looking professional.

3. Complete all of the sections in your profile

This is very important. Your LinkedIn profile should reveal more about you than your resume. Be sure to quantify your results whenever possible, too, and highlight the ways you helped grow the company. Also, SEO is especially important when recruiters do searches, so think about including key words in your descriptions. The more detailed descriptions, the higher you’ll come up on a search!

4. Include samples of your work

Although this step isn’t necessarily relevant for everyone, one of the nice things about LinkedIn is it’s a one-stop portfolio site. You can upload several files, including photos, PDFs, presentations and even Word or Excel documents. If you have it, show it off!

5. Skills and endorsements

You can include up to 50 skills, and you should! We find several candidates by looking through the Skills section. Look at keywords for the job descriptions you’re eyeing and add some of them to your skills, and then ask your friends for endorsements!

6. Get recommendations

A recommendation is like a testimonial. The more recommendations you have from people you’ve worked with, the better. Be sure to communicate with the person you’re requesting a recommendation from first. LinkedIn makes it possible for you to send reminders to people with pending requests, too.

7. Join Groups

Fact: recruiters spend a lot of time lurking in groups because members in groups can see your profile and contact you, unless you change that option on your profile. If you haven’t already, join your alumni group and as many groups as possible that make sense to your geography, industry, interest and skills.  Once you’re in groups, participate in discussions. What you post is very searchable!

8. Be connected!

LinkedIn only works for you if you make the most of it by engaging with other people, and making strategic connections. The more connections you have, the more chances you have for someone to discover you. But that doesn’t mean you should just add anyone. Add people who you meet at networking events and trade cards with, and include a message saying where you met, so they don’t think you’re spamming them.

Learn how to further optimize your LinkedIn presence by reading  this cheat sheet.  Want to learn how to be more searchable on Google? Read this blog!  And don’t forget to follow us on LinkedIn!

Priscilla Stricker

Priscilla is the Managing Partner who oversees operations, staffing and business development for Financial Professionals. She has 15+ years' experience in the staffing industry, which has allowed her a successful career of finding the right fit for clients as well as candidates. Specialties have included banking, commercial real estate, title, mortgage, accounting and financial positions at all levels.

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The MPA: Your Candidate’s Management Skills, Explained

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Growing and developing a successful team not only takes time, it takes key players with great management style. Unfortunately, not everyone is cut out for a supervisory role or is looking for career growth. How do you know if someone is coachable? A micromanager? A perfectionist? A strong resume and a great interview are good indicators for identifying qualified candidates, but they can’t assess work-related areas and personality traits that affect a person’s overall potential for a higher-level position. This is why we’re pleased to offer our Management Potential Assessment (MPA) Test, a psychological assessment designed to evaluate employees’ work style preference.

The MPA is a simple and secure online test is geared to any business wanting to add or replace key positions, hire managers or supervisors, and gain insight on employees’ work behavior. It identifies five important “behavior clusters” that analyze an individual’s work style, management styling, problem solving skills, mental stamina and how they interact with others. Employers receive an organized report that provides professional characteristics and key strengths – evaluating everything from how someone plans projects to delegate to how he reacts to stress. The report also comes with customized coaching suggestions to help develop employee performance and an action plan for an employee’s career growth.

The MPA is easy to take, applies to a broad range of industries, and results are delivered immediately. The 45-minute test was developed by Kurt G. Helm, Ph.D, a licensed and certified psychologist who has been developing effective and trusted employment tests for decades. Contact us if you’d like more information about our screening and testing services, and visit the Testing page of our website to download more information about the MPA.

Erika Boswell

Erika Boswell is Vice President of Recruiting at Financial Professionals, a Dallas-based financial staffing agency. With a background in Marketing and Management, Erika uses her expertise to place prospective job candidates and seasoned talent where they belong in the financial industry.

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The BCSS: Better Testing, Better Customer Service

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Providing excellent customer service is essential in today’s banking industry. But hiring employees who will develop and maintain customer loyalty can be daunting and time-consuming. It’s not easy to predict if a potential hire will be able to cross-sell products and services and handle customer complaints while being friendly and helpful at the same time. Often, during interviews, applicants try to look good by saying what they think employers want to hear. We take the frustration out of hiring with our Bank Customer Service Survey (BCSS) – a testing tool developed by psychologist Kurt G. Helm, Ph.D.

The BCSS evaluates a candidate’s ability to provide great customer service in a retail job setting. It tests applicants’ strengths and weaknesses, how friendly the individual is when working in sales, and how they deal with conflict situations. The test’s Results Report makes it easy for employers to make an informed decision about hiring, as well as placement and promotion. The test also provides customized training for each employee in a supplementary Developmental Report. This report provides personalized feedback and suggestions based personal audits of the candidates’ strength and weaknesses, and it includes specific training suggestions that can be used to improve an employees’ customer service style.

We’ve been using the BCSS for years as a trusted test that provides fast, convenient and accurate data. Designed for banks, this test is applicable to all businesses that want to save time and money by identifying applicants who are most likely to benefit from customer service training. For less than $10, employers receive an immediate Results Report, a Developmental report, free training for hiring manager and supervisors, as well as free telephone support. Contact us if you’d like more information about our screening and testing services, and visit the Testing page of our website to download more information about the BCSS.// <![CDATA[
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Ron Ray

Ron Ray is Owner/Chief Executive Officer of Financial Professionals, a Dallas-based financial staffing agency. Since 1981, Ron has worked with a variety of banks and banking professionals to ensure they are working with the best talent.

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What To Know About Your Credit Report Before Looking For a Job

N4_testingFinding a job in today’s current market can be tough. Most job seekers know that they need an awesome resume and a well-crafted cover letter. What few of them consider is their credit report and how it might impact their job offers. Many employers conduct credit checks for their job candidates. A bad credit report can keep you from landing that dream job you’re eyeing.

Before you begin your job search, take the time to learn check your credit report and educate yourself about what’s in it. There are several online sites available – but watch out; not all of them are reputable!  I recommend AnnualCreditReport.com. The website entitles you to a free copy of your credit report from all three credit reporting agencies. You want to check the report for errors or erroneous information. If there are any, address and dispute the information with the agency reporting it.

Once completed, you want to check the reports for items employers may see as red flags and be prepared to talk about them. There are three areas you need to review.

First, if your revolving credit total (credit cards) is higher than 30% (amount owed versus limit) in total, then you are considered to have a high credit balances. The potential employer might think that you are “over your head” in credit card debt and can’t stick to a budget. Calculate what it will take for you to get the total amount owed on credit card debt under 30%, then make a plan and follow it.

Second, look at how often you are requesting new credit. If you apply for multiple credit cards during a short period of time, you will reduce your credit score by as much as three points per inquiry. This can drastically reduce your score, and it sends the message to potential employers that you are desperate for access to extra cash.

Third, if you have significant delinquent debt, bankruptcies or foreclosures, your potential employer will be concerned whether or not your salary will cover your obligations. Even though they are not supposed to discriminate against you, they might see this as an indicator of how well you manage your finances.

The main thing to do is once you correct any erroneous errors on your credit report is develop a plan to start prioritizing paying off your current debt. Make sure you are prepared to talk about your credit report with your potential employer about why the report looks the way it does and what your plans are to improve it. If you have legitimate reasons (i.e., divorce or illness) then the employer might be sympathetic to your situation. But first and foremost, be proactive and honest.

Erika Boswell

Erika Boswell is Vice President of Recruiting at Financial Professionals, a Dallas-based financial staffing agency. With a background in Marketing and Management, Erika uses her expertise to place prospective job candidates and seasoned talent where they belong in the financial industry.

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Before the interview: How We Screen Our Job Seekers

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We like to take measured and holistic approach when it comes to finding the right employees for the job. Because we are looking for quality job seekers to match with our companies, we are careful about the candidates we place. This is why we have a thorough screening and testing procedures at Financial Professionals.

We implement a thorough national and state background screening for every employee that comes through our agency. This is not unusual; nowadays, background checks are very common in seeing whether or not employees are falsifying their applications. The Society for Human Resource Management reported that eight-seven percent of organizations conduct criminal background checks on a least some applicants. We verify if candidates have a criminal record, if they are who they say they are, and we look at their credit reports to get some insight on the candidate’s reliability and responsibility. After all, we want our employees to be responsible when it comes to handling other people’s finances.

In addition to background checks, we also give a series of tests to every person who comes through our agency. Each of these tests were designed strategically, so there’s no way for candidates to cheat the system. Our Bank Rely Test reveals employee’s work ethic, and is a good way to determine their punctuality and attendance record. The Work Attitude Questionnaire tests applicants’ attitudes toward theft and respect toward other people. It also flags checkered behavior, such as substance abuse and problems with anger management. The Bank Customer Service Survey tests a person’s strengths and weaknesses; how friendly the individual is when working in sales, and how they deal with conflict situations. The General Information Appraisal is a reliable gauge for testing one’s overall intelligence, including logic skills. Last but not least, the Teller Test, designed specifically for bank tellers, tests money math skills. We see how quickly these candidates answer the questions without a calculator. 

Unfortunately, there isn’t a guide that helps prepare candidates. The results are out of job seekers’ control. But the good news for candidates is that if they’re honest, trustworthy and responsible, chances are they’re do well passing our tests and our screening process. The best advice we give is for employees to be relaxed and get a good night’s sleep before taking their test. The rest will fall into place.

Feel free to contact us if you’d like more information about our screening and testing services.

Ron Ray

Ron Ray is Owner/Chief Executive Officer of Financial Professionals, a Dallas-based financial staffing agency. Since 1981, Ron has worked with a variety of banks and banking professionals to ensure they are working with the best talent.

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What Employers Don’t Want to See on Your Facebook Profile

Photo by Mashable.

Photo by Mashable.

In today’s day and age, social media is a major way job applicants learn more about employers – but it’s a two-way street. Many employers, including our staff at Financial Professionals, screen job seekers by looking at their Facebook profiles. The practice is becoming more common. Based on a survey conducted lasts year, CareerBuilder.com found that 37% of employers use social networks to screen potential job candidates. Many employers use social media to learn a little bit more about his or her qualifications. Of course, candidates’ resumes, cover letters and interpersonal skills weigh heavily on whether or not employers think a job applicant is the right person for the job — but companies and agencies will review candidates’ digital presence to learn if the person behind the resume presents his or herself in a professional manner online, as well as in real life. 

Sometime we find discover things that aren’t always pretty. Those embarrassing photos you posted on Facebook of yourself the other night – we see those. Those cuss words you used to describe your former boss in your last update – we read that, too. The last thing employers want to see if someone’s provocative or inappropriate party photos, chronicling a night of getting drunk and acting like they’re a rock star. Those are not the quality applicants we like present to our employers. When you’re competing against several applicants who all have an equally strong skill set, the content on your Facebook profile could be the thing that sets you apart.

Take a lesson from us and make sure that if you’re searchable online, you’re not sharing too much. Here’s how to keep things professional on Facebook.

Make your profile photo a picture of you

No matter how tight you’ve set your privacy settings, your profile photo is the one thing everybody sees. A photo of your dog or of a cartoon character isn’t the best representation of you.

Think twice before posting offensive status updates

Take a deep breath the next time you think about posting something obscene, obnoxious or even controversial. Employers are looking for people they can respect – so only show your best side by posting things you don’t have to explain later.

Have someone you trust scan your profile for red flags 

Sometimes it’s easy to miss those little details that reflect your checkered past. For example, you might’ve thought it was cool to post those photos of you partying when you were in college – but they’re not so funny if you and your friends were drinking underage. Keep anything incriminating off of Facebook, even if it isn’t recent.

Have questions about our recruiting, screening or testing? Feel free to email us today.

Priscilla Stricker

Priscilla is the Managing Partner who oversees operations, staffing and business development for Financial Professionals. She has 15+ years' experience in the staffing industry, which has allowed her a successful career of finding the right fit for clients as well as candidates. Specialties have included banking, commercial real estate, title, mortgage, accounting and financial positions at all levels.

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