Tag Archives: Culture

Are You a ‘Clone-able’ Employee? – Part 3: Team Players

The third personal attribute that I believe is requisite of a ‘clone-able’ employee is having a team player’s perspective and attitude. Within the context of organizational life, it is relatively easy to understand why this particular trait is critical.

A simple definition of ‘organization’ is a group of individuals acting on a shared purpose or set of purposes. This notion of collectively “acting” toward a common goal requires that the individuals involved both understand and accept their respective roles as well as the roles of their associates.  Without this understanding and acceptance, each individual would be left to figure out and act on whatever tasks and behaviors they individually identify; thus, creating chaos, duplication of effort, conflict, and a very ineffective organization. We can look to the science of Biology for an excellent example. Just imagine an ant colony without a common set of signals and directions, and the ants headed off in every direction trying to accomplish some task…obviously not very effective!

Conversely, team players exhibit a common set of behaviors that promotes team effectiveness, and thus organizational effectiveness. Team players make sure they understand what is expected of them and they ask questions if they don’t know. They take time to understand the larger role of their group and when they are able, offer support and assistance to their colleagues where appropriate. In addition to offering support to colleagues, team players acknowledge and celebrate their associates’ successes. Everyone appreciates a pat on the back, and it usually adds something special when it comes from one’s peer group. Furthermore, this kind of recognition promotes a feeling of belonging and cohesiveness among the team members.

In summary, the very definition of “organization” assumes that the group members consciously cooperate and support each other toward the accomplishment of the group and organization goals. Are you a team player? If not, you may want to look at a career in which you can succeed based solely upon your own efforts and accomplishments. Good Luck!

Al Sniadecki

Alan F. Sniadecki is principal and owner of Organizational Effectiveness Services, LLC in Carrollton, Texas. Al is veteran of the Financial Services industry having served over twenty years as the senior executive Human Resources Officer for several Texas based financial institutions prior to establishing his consulting firm. His practice focuses on improving organizational effectiveness in the areas of vision and mission development, strategy development and implementation, human capital management, ethics counsel and leadership coaching.

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Are You a ‘Clone-able’ Employee? – Part 2: Integrity

Why Personal Integrity is Key

After serving in several senior Human Resources roles for over thirty years (both in Fortune 100 organizations as well as fledgling startups), I can state unequivocally that the most critical and valued employee attribute in most organizations is personal integrity. My rationale for this is simple: In the context of organizations where objectives are met and strategies are achieved only through the collective efforts and interactions of people, it is essential that those interactions be conducted with the highest standards of personal integrity.

Regardless of role, personal integrity is the trait that invites human beings to trust each other. Without a culture of trust, there is simply no way of achieving maximum organizational effectiveness because employees end up expending wasted time and energy on activities such as checking ‘what the others are doing’, being careful to over communicate information that should already be known to the key stakeholders, and generally behaving in a “cya” mode. As such, tasks take longer than necessary to complete, projects miss critical milestones and organizational effectiveness is the ultimate victim.

What does personal integrity look like? Well, it manifests itself in several ways. Personal integrity is clear in:

1) The employee who honestly reports hours worked to receive pay.

2) The employee who refuses to participate in office gossip or even worse, harassing behavior toward another employee.

3) The supervisor who doesn’t “play favorites” and manages employees fairly and consistently.

4) The manager who, rather than ignore the problem, addresses the inappropriate behavior of a top producing subordinate because of its detrimental effect on the entire team.

And finally, personal integrity is doing your job to the best of your ability and working to do it even better tomorrow.

In summary, it’s a combination of honesty, reliability, consistency, courage, and an appreciation for the contribution of others. Without it, the true potential for any organization is seriously jeopardized, or as I like to put it, the truly professional organizations “demand it” and the truly professional employees “reflect it”.

 

Al Sniadecki

Alan F. Sniadecki is principal and owner of Organizational Effectiveness Services, LLC in Carrollton, Texas. Al is veteran of the Financial Services industry having served over twenty years as the senior executive Human Resources Officer for several Texas based financial institutions prior to establishing his consulting firm. His practice focuses on improving organizational effectiveness in the areas of vision and mission development, strategy development and implementation, human capital management, ethics counsel and leadership coaching.

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